If you’re a sweet potato fan, you might be wondering if your dog can eat it too. Sweet potatoes are nutritious and delicious for both people and dogs! These delicious vegetables are packed with nutritional value, and dogs go absolutely bonkers for the flavor! Sweet potatoes are an excellent addition to your dog’s diet if they’re prepared properly and given in moderation.

 

Dogs can eat sweet potatoes that are cooked, peeled, and made especially for them. Keep reading to learn more about the benefits of this tasty treat!

 

Is Sweet Potato Safe for Dogs?

In short, yes! Canines can safely eat sweet potatoes as long as they are cooked and peeled.

 

Raw sweet potatoes aren’t ideal because they can upset your dog’s stomach and cause an intestinal blockage. The plant contains trypsin inhibitors that can impact your dog’s ability to digest protein – cooking destroys these compounds.

 

 

It’s also crucial that you don’t feed your dog any part of the potato vine since it’s toxic to them. Ingesting any part of a sweet potato vine can lead to acute poisoning. The vines from sweet potatoes can adversely affect your dog’s brain, heart, liver, and kidneys.

 

Symptoms that are associated with sweet potato vine poisoning in a dog include:

  • Seizure
  • Nausea
  • Diarrhea
  • Vomiting
  • Drowsiness
  • Hallucination
  • Dilated pupils
  • Reduced heart rate
  • Excessive urination
  • Low blood pressure
  • Difficulty swallowing
  • Drooling or salivation
  • Gastrointestinal issues
  • Numbness in their paws
  • Liver and kidney damage
  • Irritation around the mouth

 

Even in small amounts, eating a vine from a sweet potato can severely hurt your dog’s health! If you have a garden in your backyard that contains sweet potatoes, your dog shouldn’t access that area. If your dog has ingested them raw or any part of the vine, you need to take them to the vet immediately!

 

Is Sweet Potato Good for Dogs?

When given appropriately, sweet potatoes make an excellent and delicious treat for your dog. The danger of a raw sweet potato and its vine shouldn’t scare you from giving your dog any cooked sweet potatoes!

 

The benefits of this healthy treat include the following:

  • Fiber: Helps with regularity in health
  • Beta-Carotene: Helps sharpen their vision
  • Vitamins A, B6, and C: Keeps your canine’s muscles, nerves, and skin in tiptop shape

 

Sweet potatoes are also low in fat and rich in calcium, potassium, and iron. Each of these minerals plays an essential part in your dog’s overall health and wellness.

 

Not to mention, sweet potatoes naturally contain properties that reduce irritation, making it a terrific choice for dogs with food allergies.

 

Related Article: The Best Dog Itchy Skin Home Remedy – Full List

 

Aside from the benefits of ingesting sweet potatoes, they may also be used as a natural home remedy for tummy troubles. Since they are high in fiber, this treat can promote natural digestion and ease any stomach issues your dog might deal with.

 

Can Dogs Be Allergic to Sweet Potato?

In rare cases, dogs can be allergic to sweet potatoes. Possible symptoms of a sweet potato allergy include itchiness, paw biting, loose stool, vomiting, and ear inflammation.

 

Since this allergy isn’t very common, it’s a good idea to consult with a veterinarian for the best advice. If you suspect your dog is allergic to sweet potatoes, the vet can perform an allergy test and rule out any other irritants.

 

Sweet potatoes are generally beneficial for a dog’s health. They’re well-tolerated by most dogs, even those prone to food allergies.

 

 

How Much Sweet Potato Can I Give My Dog?

Like with any other treat, moderation is crucial when it comes to feeding your dog sweet potato. If you choose to cook a sweet potato for your dog, it’s best to provide it to them in small portions!

 

If you have a toy dog breed, half an ounce (about 1-2 teaspoons) is a good place to start. For a larger dog, one tablespoon should do the trick.

 

Don’t overdo it! If you do, your pup may experience some gastrointestinal issues since sweet potatoes are high in fiber.  It’s wise to observe how your dog reacts to the first serving before giving them more.

 

How Can I Give Sweet Potato to My Dog?

The best way for your dog to eat a sweet potato is by cooking them at home yourself. You can prepare these vegetables in a few different ways.

 

When preparing this treat, make sure you remove the skin first. Not peeling the skin only makes it harder for your dog to eat and digest. Plus, it could even be a choking hazard for some dogs.

 

To make it easy on your puppy, slice up the peeled sweet potato into bite-size pieces. Then, you can either bake, boil, or steam them. Refrain from any roasting methods as it only takes away from its nutritional value.

 

You shouldn’t add any seasoning to the potatoes since they’re already tasty and sweet on their own. Seasoning can upset your dog’s stomach.

 

If you don’t feel comfortable preparing it at home, opt for a store-bought option. There are plenty of natural and low ingredient sweet potato treats that are good for your pup!

 

HolistaPet offers CBD Dog Treats + Heart & Immune Care for those looking to give their dog a tasty snack. These treats include sweet potatoes and blueberries to provide your puppy with a wide range of nutrients! The antioxidant boost from these ingredients promotes your dog’s heart function. Plus, CBD may boost your dog’s mood and mobility.

 

 

Final Thoughts

Sweet potatoes are an excellent source of fiber, vitamins, and minerals for pups. They can help a dog’s digestive system function better. Since sweet potatoes are whole foods, they pose little threat to the digestive tract and are unlikely to cause immune responses.

 

However, it’s crucial not to feed your pup any raw sweet potato since it can endanger their health and be a choking hazard. Similarly, the vines from sweet potatoes are poisonous to canines.

 

The best way to feed your pup sweet potatoes is by boiling or baking them without any extra ingredients. Treats are also another reliable option.


Read the original article here

Written by Mish Back at www.holistapet.com

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